'Industrialization' of Cybercrime: Sizing Up the Impact IBM Trusteer's Tubin Says Fraud Fighting Getting Tougher
'Industrialization' of Cybercrime: Sizing Up the Impact
George Tubin of IBM Security Trusteer

The "industrialization" of cybercrime, remote-access attacks and mobile-banking application and online-browser overlay attacks are trends the financial industry should monitor this year, says George Tubin, program director at IBM Security Trusteer.

Industrialization of cybercrime refers to "more private cybercrime gangs that are operating independently," Tubin says. "For a while, we saw the proliferation of the cybercrime underground with a lot of different groups specializing in different areas, whether it's writing malware itself or writing various injections or mule activity ... and putting this out on the black market for anybody to be able to access. And we saw a lot of so-called amateur cybercriminals getting into cybercrime by just going out and learning how to use these tools and learning how to access experts in cybercrime out on the Web. But now, we actually see a rise in very private, tight cybercrime gangs operating around the world."

Banking Trojans, including Dyre and Dridex, have been driven by these cybercrime groups, Tubin adds.

During an interview at RSA Conference 2016, Tubin also discusses:

  • Why mobile banking app and browser overlay attacks that bypass banking malware detection mechanisms are so concerning;
  • How remote-access attacks continue to increase; and
  • Why information sharing to fight cybercrime is more critical than ever.

Tubin served as the senior security strategist for Trusteer before it was acquired by IBM . Earlier, Tubin served as an industry consultant, specializing in financial fraud. With more than 25 years in the banking and high-technology industries, his areas of expertise include consumer online and mobile banking, online fraud and identity theft prevention and enterprise fraud-management strategies.

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